with the bold text in the example below:

Reasons why Jacks-Of-All-Trades Don’t Get Interviews

1
Download Post in PDF

I’m a multi-tasker; I have a variety of skills; In Fact, I can do all things, through Christ who strengthens me! These are the expressions that often come from jacks-of-all-trades who bask usually in the euphoria of being wondering generalities rather than meaningful specifics.

The  unfortunate thing about writing a 3-paged CV which is typical of multitask freaks with skills that are as diverse as Wilco Concert is that they are too general to fit into a particular role.

Unfortunately,  When you try to look like a match for everything, you match nothing.

Below are some of the other reasons:

A Job Opening = Specific Problem To Solve

When a company has an open position, what they really have is a particular problem that needs to be solved. The person choose to hire will be the one that can solve the problem the best and is priced right. When you are marketing dozens of things about yourself, a/k/a being a Jack-of-all-trades, you overwhelm hiring managers. In fact, you distract them to the point they are unable to see you as a match. Not only do you appear overqualified, but they may also assume you are overpriced as well…resulting in your resume going in the “no” pile.(Here’s a good example of a Jack-of-all-trades who needed to revamp his LinkedIn profile in order to finally stand out to employers.)

The Solution? Become A “Swiss Army Knife” Instead

If you find yourself in the Jack-of-all-trades situation, I suggest you re-tool yourself to appear more like a Swiss Army Knife: be clear in what each of your key skills is good for and demonstrate them with precision. Here’s what to do:

Step 1: Identify the top 5 skill sets you want to leverage in your next position. You have many skills, but you need to focus hiring managers on the skills you are most passionate about using on a daily basis so you can find a job that plays to your strengths.

Step 2: Map out how those skills support an employer in solving a problem. Clarify how will you use these skills specifically to save and/or make the company money. Ask yourself, “What pain will I alleviate when I utilize these skills for an employer?”

Step 3: Quantify your track record of success in these key skills. You need to be able to back up your abilities with facts. Articulate examples of how you have used each of these skills to help an employer so you can justify the cost of hiring you.

Step 4: Optimize your career tools (i.e. resume & LinkedIn profile), so they reflect your problem solving expertise using the skill sets you chose to showcase. Simplify these documents so the text clearly supports your area of focus. Less is more. Give hiring managers enough information to confirm you can do the specific job without overwhelming them. Your career tools should say, “I can do the job you need, but you’ll need to contact me to learn more.” (Here’s an article where I explain why your resume has only 6 seconds to get a recruiter’s attention.)

Finally, Don’t Forget To…

Once you’ve gone from branding yourself as a generalist to a specialist, you need to do one more thing: start a proactive job search. Just because you revamped your professional identity to be better suited for specific jobs, doesn’t mean employers will start responding to your online applications. If you really want to get an employer’s attention, you need to increase your networking efforts so you can spread the word about your special problem solving abilities as a way to get referred into positions. (This article maps out why your resume is useless without the right networking strategy.)

What other tips can readers share to deal with the Jack-of-all-trades challenge? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

A Structural Adaptation from J.T. O’Donnell of  CAREEREALISM

Download Post in PDF
Share.

About Author

Born Strategist, Trained Engineer, Media Enthusiast, Passionate Technologist and God's second born

1 Comment

Leave A Reply


four × 3 =

%d bloggers like this:
with the bold text in the example below:
Read previous post:
african-children-school
#SEconomy: Making Education Work Better In Nigeria

Making Education Work In Nigeria. “We do ‘gogodo’(hard farm labour), to enable us transport and eat our first meal for...

Close